Community Quilts from Karen

Before I get to today’s post, I wanted to share an email I got from Shilah.  She writes:
I am the Activity Director at Meadowview, in Johnston Iowa. We are an assisted living/memory care facility. I am reaching out to you because I am interested in getting a quilt for what we call a “dignity quilt.” We would use this to cover our residents that have passed and are leaving our building. If you have any information on how I would go about getting a quilt donated for this that would be great. I read on your website and it sounds like you have a great program and help a lot of people. That is amazing. Look forward to hearing from you soon. Thanks and have a great day.”

Does anyone have a twin-sized quilt they would be willing to donate?  Right now I don’t have any on hand.  I’m sure it wouldn’t need to be fancy but something nice.  If you do and are willing to donate it, please contact me at rogjok@iowatelecom.net.  THANKS so much!

Now to today’s post…

Karen sent emails filled with finished community quilts.  They all look fabulous and I’m excited to share them with you.

Karen writes:
I just completed 8 of the last bunch of quilt tops you sent.  These were all smaller quilts, so I mounted them on the quilting frame 2 at a time (side by side).  Makes for quicker quilting.  I quilted all of them with the pantograph seamless.  Backing and binding for all came from my stash.   

When I received these, there wasn’t any information on the maker of the tops in the package.  All of these will be donated at my guild meeting tonight and will be donated to a couple of the local nursing homes.

Thanks again for all you do to facilitate Community Quilts.”

Well here’s the quilt show…First up is one that has a Christmasy feel.


Next up is a square in a square type all in a 3X3 setting.

This one was…a study in tans and browns with moths…or are the butterflies, I’m not sure.

This was a cute idea to make big nine-patch blocks with a little farm scene in the center of each.

Karen said this was the quilting motif she used on them all…it’s a perfect one that works on most everything.

I’m almost positive that all of these came from the Cresco ladies but I’m not sure.

Here is an orphan block special.

This one has the Effiel Tower in several of the blocks.

The last one is my favorite of the bunch.  I love the big jars and the novelty prints inside.


Great work Karen…Great work to the quilt tops makers too.  Leave a comment and let us know if all of these came from the Cresco Ladies or if someone else had a hand in this too.

8 thoughts on “Community Quilts from Karen

  1. pattykat

    I absolutely love seeing the quilts that have been donated with all their different ideas and countless hours of effort. I think you should remind the sewers to include their name and where they are from with each quilt or quilt top. I know the Cesco ladies are very productive, but they can’t be doing them all. I am amazed at how the donations are coming from all over the country, and yes, Elderly living phaticities would be a great place for quilts to go. Especially when they ask for them.

    Reply
  2. Margaret in North Texas

    Well done, Karen –such pretty finishes. Thanks to you and the makers of the tops.

    well done Karen!

    Reply
  3. Chris

    The hospice I volunteer at uses a quilt like they are looking for they also use a quilt of valor for people that served. It dose make for a special good bye. I live in Wisconsin

    Reply
  4. PAT DAVIES

    My sister made a dignity quilt for the local nursing home. But it was king size! So as to drape all around. Are you sure that a twin would be long enough?

    Reply
    1. sewhappy

      a king size quilt is a lot to ask for. I hope Jo is able to locate one for this nursing home. I still have to look in my collection. I usually do lap size.

      Reply
  5. Penny Kraemer

    I made a single bed quilt for the opening of our local Hospice, their logo was butterflys, so I added 3D fabric butterflies to it. All the staff , even the custodian , pave the way with candles when the patient leaves the building. Then the staff very carefully fold the quilt and put it back in its pillowcase. It was an honour to donate this quilt, and QOV in my Dads honour.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.