Another Charity Quilt for House of Hope

Another charity quilt has been completed!  This contribution is from Dana Bartlett.  I sent it to Cheryl in Dallas for quilting and binding.

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Look at this color combination:  gray, olive green, and pure white.  It is a stretch for me to even imagine how these colors would go together, but Dana made an excellent choice with these colors and patterns.  I need to expand my horizons, and you blog readers are helping me do that.

 

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The digital quilt pattern is “Curly Feathers” by Jessica Schick.  It is available on the Urban Elementz website.

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Cheryl does all steps in the binding process on her domestic sewing machine.  Here she is sewing the binding to the front of the quilt as the first step in that process.

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The binding gets nicely squared off corners.
The second step is to sew the binding to the back side of the quilt top.

 

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It worked!  The top view of the quilt binding is perfectly aligned so the finishing seam is even.

Many quilters believe that bindings must be hand-sewn in place, and they find it relaxing to do.  For others, however, who have not-so-much time (me) or arthritis in their hands (Cheryl), machine binding is the preferred method.

And now the final reveal on a backyard fence in Dallas.   Isn’t this a beauty?!

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Here’s a close-up showing the intricate piecing of the central motif.  Dana did a fabulous job of piecing this.  All the points are perfectly matched-up.  The Quilt Police won’t be able to find any fault with this fine workmanship.

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Let’s do a close-up at one of the olive green stars.

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. . . and another of the dark stars.  I love stars of any kind and this quilt top has a variety of colors, sizes, and shapes.

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The backing was a collaborative effort.  I contributed the dark gray sheet, and that became the top and the bottom sections.  The lime green portion in the center is from a lengthy piece of yardage given to Cheryl by a quilter in Texas who wanted the fabric to be used for charity quilts.  The smaller gray stripes are from Cheryl’s scrappy stash.  Contributions from four quilters who have never met each other came together in this beautiful quilt.  That’s how the Quilting Community works.

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The backing looks like it was planned that way when the quilt top was created.

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The finished project gets the approval of Tide, the resident Quilt Inspector in Dallas.   (No, not the detergent; think “Roll, Tide, Roll.”)

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And Libe got to chew on the batting and backing trimmings when the quilt came off the frame.

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This gray and lime green beauty is on its way via Federal Express to the House of Hope in Gainesville, Florida.  The next new resident there will complete the circle of this quilt’s destiny.

Thanks ladies!  And pups!

Isn’t is great to see that many hands came together to make such an awesome quilt!

 

 

 

 

20 thoughts on “Another Charity Quilt for House of Hope

  1. Billie

    The quilt is great. Don’t know if I’d ever thought to go that way with those colors. Looks great! But the part that really got me excited was the machine binding. Jo, you got me thinking…….I should do some machine binding….so far I’m not happy with my binding. but I keep trying. I’d love to pick Cheryl’s brain on her machine binding and the foot on her machine.

    Reply
  2. Pat sparks

    Love the quilt even tho I go for more drab colors. Really interested in what number foot that is that looked like a awesome way to do bindings. I would love to find out more about they way she does the bindings….that would be the ticket.

    Reply
  3. Sharon Malone

    I notice that Cheryl is using a Bernina machine to attach the binding to the quilt. I have a Bernina machine but don’t recognize the foot she is using. Can someone identify that foot for me?

    Reply
  4. Cheryl in Dallas

    I use flat fell foot #71 on my Bernina to sew quilt bindings. I learned this method by studying the following tutorial on the Internet:

    https://awomanaday.com/2013/01/17/happy-feet-quilt-binding-edition/

    After doing three or so quilts using this binding method, it has become second nature for me. Best of all, with a little practice, I find that this method is very accurate and the bindings look great each time.

    I am so glad that quilters have shared their wonderful experience with me via the Internet.

    Reply
  5. Margaret

    I’m with Brenna, I would love to know how to get a hold of the pattern for the quilt, I need to add to my to-do list!!
    I have done the method Cheryl used for binding, it does work very well. But you should cut your binding 2″ instead of 2.5″.

    Reply
  6. Kristy Wilkinson

    Jo- you are the most amazing connector of people! I love how you have made your charity work something that all can contribute to. What a beautiful quilt, gorgeous quilting and wonderful back. So glad we get to see everyone’s contribution, even the doggies! :-) K-

    Reply
  7. Robby

    Every quilt has something special about it, but I think these quilts that have been made by many hands, each offering what they do best are extra special. This one is so lovely with each new step something special is added.

    Reply
  8. Tami Chaulk

    I’d like to say thank you too all the quilters that added their hand to the making of a quilt that will go to comfort another. The quilt is lovely, the Curly Feathers are great and the backing is wonderful! I’m one of those that love hand sewing on the binding, but I’m thinking I might want to look into getting myself a flat fell foot #71 as my RA is getting worse.

    Reply
  9. Pat

    Possibly the prettiest charity quilt I’ve ever seen…would have been a great fund raising quilt. Love the colors, the pattern, and the quilting! Kudos to all who contributed!

    Reply

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