Community Quilts from Cheryl

It’s always a happy day when Cheryl sends me pictures of finished quilts.  I think we all can agree on that!!

I received two beautiful quilt tops in the fall of 2020, and since both of them were large enough for bed covers, I sent them to Cheryl in Dallas for finishing.

First up is this beautiful top made by Joann in San Francisco Bay.  Joann’s top is entirely made of half-square triangles.  It’s a simple concept and beautifully executed.

Joann used the same cream color solid fabric for all of the HSTs and for the inner border.  The wider outer border is a cute orange print.

These prints look like they are coordinated, maybe from the same fabric collection.  Does anyone recognize it?

The solid green for the binding came from Cheryl’s stash.  It looks like the green is the same color as the middle of those tiny white flowers, but, no! those flower centers are blue. The quilting pattern is called Buzz, which is an Apricot Mood Design and digitized by Peg Linder.  It is available at Urban Elementz.  The loopy flowers are a quilter’s attempt to mimic the white flowers in the border fabric.  Looks good!

The color of the tiny white flowers is copied over to the all-white backing.

The backing is a white sheet. I love it — no piecing required.  The white also keeps the crisp look of the quilt going.

A last look at Joann’s quilt.  This one is 81” x 90,” which could be used as a bedspread for a twin bed.

Today’s second quilt was made by a Blog Reader in Omaha…

Although I don’t know the name of the Blog Reader in Omaha, I do recognize the pattern as En Provence, Bonnie Hunter’s mystery quilt from 2016.  So many quarter square triangles!  So many 4-patches!  So many triangles in squares!  This quilt is 90” x 90” and is suitable for a queen-size bed.

The Blog Reader in Omaha did a wonderful job of piecing En Provence.  It always amazes me when people donate Bonnie Hunter quilts . . .  because of all the tiny pieces in those quilts.

Does anyone love this color combination as much as an LSU fan does?  Geaux Tigers!

 

The purple batik binding came from Cheryl’s stash.  It blends right in with all the many purples in the quilt.  Although I love the original colors Bonnie Hunter picked for this quilt, my favorite part of Blog Reader’s version are the huge variety of neutrals.  See those tiny turtles next to the binding?  How cute.

 

The backing is a water-color print and has the same colors as in the top.  A quilter in Texas donated the wide fabric to Cheryl for use in a charity quilt.  It looks like it was waiting just for En Provence.

Cheryl in Dallas told me she was embarrassed when she saw the following photo.  It wasn’t until the quilt was already finished that she noticed something unusual about the backing.  The backing is made of two pieces of fabric that were sewed together (vertically in this picture).  Can you see what’s going on?  Don’t feel bad, Cheryl, we’ve all been there at some time.

 

 

These two quilts are going to Luke’s Closet, a ministry of Dallas Theological Seminary.  Luke’s Closet distributes basic household goods and bed linens to students attending the four-year school.  Most of the people who request sheets, pillows, and comforters (or handmade quilts!) from Luke’s Closet are single or married students living in the seminary dorms.  With the ice storm in Texas during February, there was a huge request for these items.  Those Texas people aren’t used to cold weather as we have in Iowa, so I know two students are going to love having these beautiful quilts to keep them warm.  Thank you, Joann, Blog Reader, and Cheryl for working on these quilts.

 

 

 

 

 

12 thoughts on “Community Quilts from Cheryl

  1. Stearns Carol

    I’m with you. Cant imagine donating a Bonnie Hunter quilt. Although I’m getting close with Grassy Creek. All the blocks are done but they are in a bag ready for a retreat of sorts. And Frolic is done but not quilted. Lots of quilting needing to be done. Beautiful job Cheryl and the recipient of the quilt won’t notice the back. Just how pretty it is.

    Reply
  2. Ginny Clyne

    I had to look at the back multiple times to see what you were talking about. I don’t think a non sewer would even notice as it is such a beautiful quilt front and back. Both quilts are gorgeous.

    Reply
  3. Margaret in North Texas

    It took me awhile to spot the ” error” also. It’s a gorgeous quilt! As is the other one. Job well done by each of you, Joann, blog reader and Cheryl.

    Reply
    1. Cheryl in Dallas

      The backing on the second quilt is directional. On the right side of the quilt, the yellow streaks form “mountains” that peak upward. On the left side of the quilt, someone (not naming names) turned the fabric upside down, and now the yellow streaks are “valleys” because they point downward. Someone didn’t even notice the fabric was directional because she didn’t look at it from a distance. Ugh! Maybe the recipient will never hang the quilt up on a wall and look at it from afar. . .

      Reply
      1. Dianne R

        Unless it’s pointed out, I don’t think most people will notice it. It’s gorgeous and beautiful work by all.

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      2. Laurie

        Oh my gosh, I stared at it forever and never got it! Thanks for explaining – not to be critical of Cheryl but just to satisfy my curiosity! No one will ever know!

        Reply
  4. Laurie

    Bless the blog reader that donates any quilt! But a Bonnie Hunter quilt?! Those are some of my favorites and are just so much fun! Each quilt represents its own season of our lives when we gather from across the globe to make them. Some with our quilt groups, some alone at home for the holidays. The Unity and Grassy Creek are especially rememberable. Those were life milestones we all endured together! May God protect us against any more 2020/21’s.

    The quilts are gorgeous! The backing will never be noticed when it’s wrapping someone up in love and warmth!

    Reply
  5. Tammy Jewkes

    Beautiful quilts! The first one is made with Farm House II by Fig Tree. I just love “simple” quilts.

    Reply
  6. Sherrill

    I was thinking the EXACT same thing as I began reading about that quilt–who would go to ALL the trouble making a Bonnie quilt and then donate it? It’s a beauty and I really think the backing is a non-issue, it’s all so pretty!! The main difference about our cold spell was the fact that the majority of us didn’t have electricity!! I was out for 12 hours over the -1 degree night..BRRRRRR!!

    Reply

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